Wikileaks timeline of events

28th June 2012 – Source: thepeoplesrecord.com

Wikileaks timeline of events (photo)
thepeoplesrecord:Wikileaks timeline of events (photo)June 25, 2012October 2006: Wikileaks launches as a safehaven for whistleblowers wanting to expose corruption in Third World countries.2008: Julian Assange is honored with the Freedom of Expression Award by The Economist magazine. June 2009: Assange is awarded with the 2009 Amnesty International UK Media Award for exposing assassination plots and human rights violations in Kenya.February 2010: Wikileaks begins releasing more than 250,000 cables sent to the U.S. State Department from hundreds of international embassies and consulates. The first document released was Reykjavik cable 13, which exposed corruption in Icelandic banks. This is reported to be the first document Pfc. Breanna Manning, also known as Bradley Banning, sent to Wikileaks.April 2010: Wikileaks begins publishing thousands of U.S. cables, including the Collateral Murder video, which portrays a U.S. helicopter firing on civilians and two Reuters journalists in Baghdad in 2007.  May 2010: Pfc. Breanna Manning is arrested in Iraq for allegedly leaking classified cables to Wikileaks. July 2010: The Afghan War diaries are released - 76,900 documents about the war and torture tactics previously hidden from the public.August 2010: Woman AA invites Assange to speak at a seminar about Afghanistan. Woman SW invites Assange to stay at her place. Text message evidence shows the women find out about each other and conspire to tarnish his reputation and Wikileaks. The women go to Swedish police to file a sexual assault report. Police go against interrogation procedures, and do not film the women’s testimonies. Police allege rape; women never claim Assange raped them - police officers were the only ones who claimed rape. Assange stays in Sweden for five weeks offering to be interviewed; all interview requests were denied. He leaves Sweden with permission.October 2010: Assange is awarded with the Sam Adams Award for Integrity in Intelligence.The Iraq War logs are released - more than 390,000 reports documenting thousands of civilian deaths; it is also the biggest military leak in U.S. history. Assange offers to fly to Sweden twice more to be interviewed; both requests are rejected, once because the date landed on a weekend and the other because the date was “too far away.”November 2010: Julian Assange works with The Guardian (UK), The New York Times (U.S.), El Pais (Spain), Der Spiegel (Germany) and Le Monde (France) to publish the first 220 Cablegate files. The cables exposed U.S. exploitation, bullying and intimidation tactics used against other countries. November 26, 2010: Assange sends a letter to the U.S. asking to point out information that would potentially put lives at risk. The Department of State refuses rejects the request. Also, Sweden files a European Arrest Warrant from the prosecutor, not a judge as they are legally obliged to do. An EAW is also only supposed to be issued to prosecute, not to merely question a suspect.November 28, 2010: The five newspapers Wikileaks partnered with begin publishing selected cables; the other unreleased Cablegate documents are published on Wikileaks’ site. Shortly thereafter, many politicians, including Rick Santorum, Mike Huckabee, Tom Flannagan and Hillary Clinton, condemn Assange a terrorist and some even condone his assassination. December 2010: PayPal, Visa, MasterCard, Bank of America and Western Union block donations to Wikileaks, cutting off 95 percent of its funding. The financial block comes after pressure from U.S. President Barack Obama. Swiss Bank Post Finance also froze Assange’s defense fund. Amazon also removed Wikileaks from its storage servers, and Apple removed an app that allowed users to search cables from their phones.December 7, 2010: Assange turns himself over for voluntary custody in the UK. He spends seven days in solitary confinement, and Sweden and the judge refuse the bail put up by his supporters.December 8, 2010: It is confirmed that Sweden and the United States begin informal talks about extraditing Assange to the U.S.December 14, 2010: Assange is granted bail of $374,000, gives up his passport, is put under house arrest with 10 p.m. curfews, ordered to wear an ankle monitor and forced to report to the local police station daily. After all of this, he has still not been charged for a crime in any country.February 2011: Assange is awarded with the Sydney Peace Foundation gold medal by the Sydney Peace Foundation and the University of Sydney for publicizing international human rights violations. Both Nelson Mandela and the Dalai Lama are previous recipients of the award. June 2011: Assange is awarded with the Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism, given to investigative journalists who uncovers government propaganda. June 2011: Assange is presented with the Walkley Award for Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism. July 2011: Wikileaks files a complaint with the European Commissioner for infringement of European Union Anti-Trust Laws about the financial block. It is estimated that Wikileaks has been blocked from more than $20 million in donations. They are still waiting for a response. January 2012: Assange launches “The World Tomorrow,” an in-depth interview series with an international focus on RT. May 30, 2012: Assange loses his extradition appeal. He expects he will be handed over to the United States once he faces questioning in Sweden.June 19, 2012: Assange applies for political asylum at the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa has been interviewed on “The World Tomorrow” and has expressed his support for Wikileaks. As of today, the Ecuadorian is still making a decision on Assange’s application. - G. Razo
October 2006: Wikileaks launches as a safehaven for whistleblowers wanting to expose corruption in Third World countries.

2008: Julian Assange is honored with the Freedom of Expression Award by The Economist magazine.

June 2009: Assange is awarded with the 2009 Amnesty International UK Media Award for exposing assassination plots and human rights violations in Kenya.

February 2010: Wikileaks begins releasing more than 250,000 cables sent to the U.S. State Department from hundreds of international embassies and consulates. The first document released was Reykjavik cable 13, which exposed corruption in Icelandic banks. This is reported to be the first document Pfc. Breanna Manning, also known as Bradley Banning, sent to Wikileaks.

April 2010: Wikileaks begins publishing thousands of U.S. cables, including the Collateral Murder video, which portrays a U.S. helicopter firing on civilians and two Reuters journalists in Baghdad in 2007.

May 2010: Pfc. Breanna Manning is arrested in Iraq for allegedly leaking classified cables to Wikileaks.

July 2010: The Afghan War diaries are released – 76,900 documents about the war and torture tactics previously hidden from the public.

August 2010: Woman AA invites Assange to speak at a seminar about Afghanistan. Woman SW invites Assange to stay at her place. Text message evidence shows the women find out about each other and conspire to tarnish his reputation and Wikileaks. The women go to Swedish police to file a sexual assault report.

Police go against interrogation procedures, and do not film the women’s testimonies. Police allege rape; women never claim Assange raped them – police officers were the only ones who claimed rape. Assange stays in Sweden for five weeks offering to be interviewed; all interview requests were denied. He leaves Sweden with permission.

October 2010: Assange is awarded with the Sam Adams Award for Integrity in Intelligence.

The Iraq War logs are released – more than 390,000 reports documenting thousands of civilian deaths; it is also the biggest military leak in U.S. history. Assange offers to fly to Sweden twice more to be interviewed; both requests are rejected, once because the date landed on a weekend and the other because the date was “too far away.”

November 2010: Julian Assange works with The Guardian (UK), The New York Times (U.S.), El Pais (Spain), Der Spiegel (Germany) and Le Monde (France) to publish the first 220 Cablegate files. The cables exposed U.S. exploitation, bullying and intimidation tactics used against other countries.

November 26, 2010: Assange sends a letter to the U.S. asking to point out information that would potentially put lives at risk. The Department of State refuses rejects the request. Also, Sweden files a European Arrest Warrant from the prosecutor, not a judge as they are legally obliged to do. An EAW is also only supposed to be issued to prosecute, not to merely question a suspect.

November 28, 2010: The five newspapers Wikileaks partnered with begin publishing selected cables; the other unreleased Cablegate documents are published on Wikileaks’ site. Shortly thereafter, many politicians, including Rick Santorum, Mike Huckabee, Tom Flannagan and Hillary Clinton, condemn Assange a terrorist and some even condone his assassination.

December 2010: PayPal, Visa, MasterCard, Bank of America and Western Union block donations to Wikileaks, cutting off 95 percent of its funding. The financial block comes after pressure from U.S. President Barack Obama. Swiss Bank Post Finance also froze Assange’s defense fund.

Amazon also removed Wikileaks from its storage servers, and Apple removed an app that allowed users to search cables from their phones.

December 7, 2010: Assange turns himself over for voluntary custody in the UK. He spends seven days in solitary confinement, and Sweden and the judge refuse the bail put up by his supporters.

December 8, 2010: It is confirmed that Sweden and the United States begin informal talks about extraditing Assange to the U.S.

December 14, 2010: Assange is granted bail of $374,000, gives up his passport, is put under house arrest with 10 p.m. curfews, ordered to wear an ankle monitor and forced to report to the local police station daily. After all of this, he has still not been charged for a crime in any country.

February 2011: Assange is awarded with the Sydney Peace Foundation gold medal by the Sydney Peace Foundation and the University of Sydney for publicizing international human rights violations. Both Nelson Mandela and the Dalai Lama are previous recipients of the award.

June 2011: Assange is awarded with the Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism, given to investigative journalists who uncovers government propaganda.

June 2011: Assange is presented with the Walkley Award for Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism.

July 2011: Wikileaks files a complaint with the European Commissioner for infringement of European Union Anti-Trust Laws about the financial block. It is estimated that Wikileaks has been blocked from more than $20 million in donations. They are still waiting for a response.

January 2012: Assange launches “The World Tomorrow,” an in-depth interview series with an international focus on RT.

May 30, 2012: Assange loses his extradition appeal. He expects he will be handed over to the United States once he faces questioning in Sweden.

June 19, 2012: Assange applies for political asylum at the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa has been interviewed on “The World Tomorrow” and has expressed his support for Wikileaks. As of today, the Ecuadorian is still making a decision on Assange’s application.

– G. Razo

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