Government can’t say what it would do to protect Assange from the US, Senate can’t admit the Walkley Foundation thinks he’s a journalist

29 Feb | Broadband, Communications & the Digital Economy

The Government and the Opposition took squirming to new heights today in regards to the threat of prosecution in the USA faced by Australian citizen and WikiLeaks chief, Julian Assange.

Greens communications spokesperson Senator Scott Ludlam asked Labor’s Chris Evans, as the Senator representing the Prime Minister, what the Government knew of the sealed Grand Jury indictment against Mr Assange.

“Either the Government has been kept ignorant by their American allies for thirteen months, or they have been keeping the sealed indictment a secret from the Australian public

“The Government say they are not aware of any charges by the US Government against Mr Assange. Let’s assume, then, that they’ve been kept in the dark for more than a year by Washington, which is hardly reassuring.

“Asked if the Prime Minister will ascertain whether this sealed indictment against an Australian citizen exists – the Government had no answer.

“Asked what the Government would do if the US attempted to extradite Mr Assange, the Government had no answer.”

Later, Senator Ludlam moved a motion for the Senate to acknowledge that Mr Assange had been recognised as a journalist by organisations including the Walkley Foundation and the British High Court.

“This was too frightening for the Labor Party and the Coalition. They sat there and voted against a list of seven undisputed facts. What could have got them so spooked?”

Media Contact: Giovanni Torre

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